Monday, November 25, 2019

Hummingbird season: When to put up & take down your feeders

Many people look forward to hummingbird season. Feeding and watching the antics of these hyperactive and sometimes pugnacious birds brings much joy.

But some questions come up about feeding hummingbirds. When should I put out my hummingbird feeders in the spring? When should I take down my hummingbirds in the fall? Can I keep my hummingbird feeder up through the winter? Should I?

This article answers those questions as well as tells you exactly when hummingbird season is in each state.

Photo of a female Anna's Hummingbird at a feeder
Anna's Hummingbird
Photo by Greg Gillson

Feeding hummingbirds


Feeding hummingbirds sugar water ("nectar") is a fun activity with very little downside. Keep the sugar to water ratio at 1 to 4 to mimic natural flower nectar. I discuss the hummingbird nectar recipe  in this article.

As long as you keep your hummingbird feeders clean, they are safe and helpful to our diminutive feathered friends. My recommendation is to fill the feeder with only what the hummingbirds drink completely in 3-5 days. Then always clean the feeders when refilling--never just top off a feeder. Clean and refill any time the nectar becomes cloudy or you notice any dark patches of mold inside.

Nectar, natural from flowers or that which you provide in your feeders, is not the only thing that hummingbirds eat. They also eat flying insects and spiders.

This means that if you stop feeding hummingbirds for any reason the hummingbirds will survive just fine. They won't die because you quit feeding them. They'll find food elsewhere.

When to put up your hummingbird feeders


Hummingbirds will surely appreciate having extra hummingbird food during the spring migration. Most hummingbirds migrate to southern climes in winter. They return very early in spring. Nights are still cold and they may even encounter snow or freezing temperatures. Very few flowers are in bloom and insect food is scarce. Yet here they are, following their instinctive innate migratory behavior. Your feeder can provide some needed energy to keep them going until they reach their final destination.

Thus, having your hummingbird feeders set up and out for the earliest migrants can really help them in spring. Hummingbirds don't all migrate at the same time. The angle of the sun on their wintering grounds triggers their hormones and eventually the urge to migrate turns into action. Weather they encounter on their travels may aid or hamper their travels.

In general, males migrate and arrive on their breeding grounds a week or two before the females. Males then set up and defend territories around food sources--flowers or even your hummingbird feeders. Females arrive and find the males. After mating, the females set up separate nesting territories and defend against other hummingbirds. The males take no part in nest building, incubating, or raising the young--the cad!

Within weeks the young are out of the nest and flying about. This is when visitors to your hummingbird feeders really increase. The young-of-the-year make up the bulk of hummingbirds at your feeder through late summer and fall.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in spring a week before you expect the first birds to arrive. Then they'll be ready when the first migrants pass through.

When to take down your hummingbird feeders for winter


When do hummingbirds leave? In the West, male hummingbirds are done with their contribution to the next generation in early summer. By early July they have left the lowlands and head up into the mountains. There they find flowers blooming higher and higher as they make their way south in the mountains to southern Mexico for the winter.

"Where did all my hummingbirds go?" people ask. Mexico. Now you know. (Kind of kidding

But the young birds still hang around their nesting area. These will remain at your feeders through fall. They are joined by migrants from further north as weather changes and hormones impel them southward.

Hummingbirds in fall will feed from your feeders and gain energy for their migration. Your hummingbird feeders will not cause hummingbirds not to migrate. Hormones are greater than even free food.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up until there are no more hummingbirds. Take your hummingbird feeders down for the winter two weeks after you see the last hummingbird. That way you may feed any late stragglers.

Feeding hummingbirds in winter


On the West Coast, from Vancouver, Canada southward through Baja, and into parts of Arizona, the Anna's Hummingbird is a resident species. There is no need to take your hummingbird feeders down in winter if you live there! In fact, Anna's Hummingbirds nest from late December into February!

Also, in the Southwest deserts, Costa's Hummingbirds remain in the United States during winter.

From Texas to Florida some hummingbirds of several species are rare winter visitors--especially near the coast. Keep feeding all winter as long as there are hummingbirds!

Is a late hummingbird just moving through, or will it stay to spend the winter? Hummingbird migration lasts into November. If you still have any hummingbirds by mid-December, they will likely remain through the winter. Such wintering birds may remain in place until March or April! Hurray!

To keep hummingbird feeders from freezing in winter you may place the feeder near an incandescent porch light that provides some heat. If that's not practical, bring the feeder into your home well after dark. Hummingbirds feed well after dusk on cold winter nights. Put the feeder out at dawn so that cold hummers have some room-temperature calories to warm up with on cold winter mornings.

Hummingbird season in each state


In this section I use real data from eBird to determine when regular hummingbirds are present in each state in the United States. Then you can know when to set up and take down your feeders based on birds in your area.

If I mention hummingbirds in winter then that species occurs regularly, even if very rarely. Most states have had several rare hummingbird species show up in winter over the years, but not regularly enough to mention or expect. But that rare hummingbird will only show up at your feeder if your feeder is set up with fresh nectar!

Alabama

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Alabama about the 2nd week of March and depart Alabama about the 1st week of November.

A few Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Rufous Hummingbirds, and Black-chinned Hummingbirds winter rarely but regularly in Alabama.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in Alabama by the first week of March. Take them down in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Alaska

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive in Southeast and Southcentral Alaska the first week of April and depart at the end of August.

Anna's Hummingbirds are most common from late August to late April in Southeast and southcentral Alaska. They are less common in summer.

A few Costa's Hummingbirds have shown up as rarities in fall in Alaska.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up year round in Southeast and Southcentral Alaska.

Arizona

Check a range map or eBird for what hummingbirds are expected in your Arizona county. Many hummingbird species are found only in Southern or Southeastern Arizona.

Rivoli's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Arizona.

Most of the Plain-capped Starthroats arrive in Southern Arizona the first week of July and depart in mid-September.

Blue-throated Mountain-gems are year-round residents in Southern Arizona.

Lucifer Hummingbirds arrive in Southern Arizona in the last week of March and remain until the first week of October.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Arizona the first week of March and depart at the end of October.

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Arizona.

Costa's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Arizona.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in Arizona the 1st week of March and depart the first week of November.

Rufous Hummingbirds migrate through Arizona in spring from mid-February to mid-May. Rufous-hummingbirds migrate through Arizona in fall from the 1st week of July to the first week of November.

Calliope Hummingbirds migrate through Arizona in spring from the last week of March until Mid-May. In fall Calliope Hummingbirds migrate through Arizona from mid-July to the first week of October.

Broad-billed Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Arizona.

Most Berylline Hummingbirds arrive in Southern Arizona in mid-July and depart the first week of September.

Violet-crowned Hummingbirds arrive in Southern Arizona the 2nd week of January and depart in mid-November.

White-eared Hummingbirds arrive in Southeastern Arizona the 2nd week of May and depart the first week of September.

If you live in Arizona keep a bunch of hummingbird feeders up year round!

Arkansas

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Arkansas the last week of March and depart in the middle of November.

Seven rare hummingbirds have wintered in Arkansas, but none regularly.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Arkansas by the middle of March. Take your hummingbird feeders down in December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Photo of a male Allen's Hummingbird on a flowering bush
Allen's Hummingbird
Photo by Greg Gillson

California

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in California the last week of March and depart the last week of September.

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in California.

Costa's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in the deserts of Southern California.

Rufous Hummingbirds migrate through California in spring from mid-February to the 3rd week of May. Fall migration starts immediately; Rufous Hummingbirds migrate through California in fall from mid-June to the end of September.

Allen's Hummingbirds are resident in coastal Southern California. Elsewhere in coastal Central and Northern California, Allen's Hummingbirds arrive in mid-January and depart the 1st week of August.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in California the first week of April and depart in mid-August.

Residents of California should keep their hummingbird feeders up all year.

Colorado

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Colorado in mid-April and depart the 1st week of October.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in Colorado the 2nd week of April and depart in mid-October.

Rufous Hummingbirds pass through Colorado in fall migration from late June through September.

Calliope Hummingbirds pass through Colorado in fall migration from the 1st week of July to the 3rd week of September.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Colorado by the 1st of April. Take your feeders down in November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Connecticut

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Connecticut in mid-April and depart in mid-October.

There are several reports of Rufous Hummingbirds in fall and winter.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in early April in Connecticut. Take your feeders down in November if you haven't seen a hummingbird in 2 weeks.

Delaware

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive the first week of April in Delaware and depart in mid-October.

Put your hummingbird feeders out by April 1st in Delaware. Take your feeders down in November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Florida

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are found year-round in Florida, more abundantly during the spring and fall migrations. Peak numbers are found from late March to mid-May and then again from the first week of June to the 1st week in November.

Many other hummingbirds have been reported in Florida. Black-chinned Hummingbirds and Rufous Hummingbirds have wintered.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up year-round in Florida.

Georgia

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive the 2nd week of March in Georgia and most depart by November.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds and Rufous Hummingbirds are rare but regular in winter. Black-chinned Hummingbirds and Calliope Hummingbirds are even more rare in winter in Georgia.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up all year in Georgia. If you haven't seen any hummingbirds for 3 weeks by mid-December, go ahead and take down your feeders until the beginning of March. Hummingbirds aren't likely to move around much in winter.

Hawaii

No hummingbirds live in Hawaii. But there are many other colorful tropical birds. Honeycreepers are nectar eaters, but apparently are only attracted to native flowers, not nectar feeders. Too bad, because most types are endangered and could use the help.

Idaho

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Idaho in early April and depart in mid-October.

Anna's Hummingbirds are rare visitors to Idaho. Some birds remain all year, but most are winter visitors. Most arrive in September and depart the 1st week of March.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in late April and depart by the 3rd week of September.

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive the 2nd week of April and depart the 1st week of October.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive the 1st week of April and depart in late September.

Put up your hummingbird feeders the end of March in Idaho. Take down your feeders about November 1st if you haven't had any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Illinois

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Illinois the 2nd week of April and depart in late October.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Illinois the 1st week of April. Take down your feeders by December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Indiana

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Indiana about the 1st week of April and depart by the end of October.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Indiana in late March. Take down your feeders in early December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Iowa

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Iowa in late April and depart in late October.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Iowa in mid-April. Take down your feeders in late November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Kansas

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Kansas about the 2nd week of April and depart in late October.

Rufous Hummingbirds are rare fall migrants in Kansas, from July through September.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Kansas in early April. Take your feeders down in late November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Kentucky

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Kentucky the last week of March and depart by the end of November.

Rufous Hummingbirds winter rarely in Kentucky.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in Kentucky in mid-March. Take down your feeders by mid-December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Louisiana

The bulk of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Louisiana the 1st week of March and depart by November. However, many also spend the entire winter.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds winter in Louisiana, arriving in September and remaining through April.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds winter in Louisiana, most arrive in mid-November and depart in early February. Some arrive earlier and stay later.

Rufous Hummingbirds winter in Louisiana, arrive the 1st week of August and depart in April.

Calliope Hummingbirds winter in Louisiana, arrive in mid-November and depart in mid-April.

Buff-bellied Hummingbirds winter in Louisiana, arrive in mid-September and depart in April.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up all year in Louisiana!

Maine

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Maine in mid-April and depart by late October.

Put your hummingbird feeders up in Maine the 2nd week of April. Take your feeders down in early November if you haven't seen a hummingbird in 2 weeks.

Maryland

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Maryland in mid-April and depart by late October.

Rufous Hummingbirds sometimes winter in Maryland, arrive in September and depart in late April.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Maryland in early April. Take your feeders down in late November if you haven't seen a hummingbird in 2 weeks.

Massachusetts

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Massachusetts the 2nd week of April and depart in late November.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Massachusetts by the 1st of April. Take your feeders down by the beginning of December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Michigan

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Michigan in late April and depart mid-October.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Michigan in early April. Take your feeders down in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Minnesota

Ruby-throated Hummingbird arrives in Minnesota in late April and departs in late October.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Minnesota in mid-April. Take your hummingbird feeders down in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Mississippi

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds in Mississippi arrive in late February and depart in late December.

Occasional wintering hummingbirds in Mississippi include Ruby-throated, Black-chinned, Rufous, Calliope, and Buff-bellied.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up year-round in Mississippi. If you haven't seen any hummingbirds for 2 weeks in late December you may take your feeders down. Put them up in mid-February again.

Missouri

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Missouri in late March and depart in late November.

Put your hummingbird feeders up in Missouri the 2nd week of March. Take your feeders down in mid-December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds for 2 weeks.

Montana

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Montana the 1st week of May and depart in late September.

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive in Montana the 2nd week of April and depart late September.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in Montana the 2nd week of April and depart in late September.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive the 1st week of May and depart in mid-September.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds are rare fall migrants in Montana, primarily August and September.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in Montana the 1st week of April. Take your feeders down in early November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Nebraska

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Nebraska in late April and depart the 3rd week of October.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Nebraska the 3rd week of April. Take down your feeders in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Nevada

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in western and southern Nevada.

Costa's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in southern Nevada.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Nevada in mid-March and depart the end of October.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in Nevada in early March and depart in late September.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in Nevada in late March and depart at the end of September.

Rufous Hummingbirds migrate through Nevada in spring (2nd week of March through May) and fall (mid-June to mid-October).

If you live in western or southern Nevada then keep your hummingbird feeders up all year round. Otherwise, put out your hummingbird feeders in Nevada in early March. Take down your feeders in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

New Hampshire

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in New Hampshire the 2nd week of April and depart in mid-October.

Take down your hummingbird feeders in mid-November in New Hampshire if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

New Jersey

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in New Jersey in late March and depart in early November.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in New Jersey in mid-March. Take down your feeders in New Jersey in early December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

New Mexico

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in New Mexico in early March and depart the 3rd week of November.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in New Mexico in early March and depart in late November.

Rufous Hummingbirds are fall migrants in New Mexico, arriving in mid-June and departing in mid-November.

Calliope Hummingbirds are fall migrants in New Mexico, arriving the end of June and departing the end of October.

Anna's, Broad-tailed, and Rufous Hummingbirds winter occasionally in New Mexico.

Several rare species of hummingbirds are found in Southwestern New Mexico in summer and fall (some are found all year). These include Rivoli's, Blue-throated Mountain-gem, Lucifer, Broad-billed, Violet-crowned hummingbirds and others, even more rare.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in late February in New Mexico. Take down your feeders in late December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks. However, since the chance for a wintering hummingbirds is high, you may want to keep your feeders up all year round.

New York

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in New York in early April and depart in mid-November.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in New York in late March. Take down your feeders in early December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

North Carolina

Most Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in North Carolina in late March and depart in mid-November. However, a good number of Ruby-throated Hummingbirds spend the entire winter.

No other hummingbird species regularly winter in North Carolina. However, 10 species of rare hummingbirds have wintered.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up year-round in North Carolina.

North Dakota

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in North Dakota the last week of April and depart the 1st week of October.

Put your hummingbird feeders out in North Dakota the 3rd week of April. Take down your feeders in mid-October if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Ohio

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Ohio the 1st week of April and depart in November.

Several rare hummingbirds have been found in Ohio from September through December.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in Ohio the last week of March. Take down your feeders in mid-December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Oklahoma

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Oklahoma in the last week of March and depart in late October.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Oklahoma the last week of March and depart the 3rd week of October.

Rufous Hummingbirds are fall migrants in Oklahoma, primarily mid-July to late September. However, there are several November records, too.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Oklahoma the 3rd week of March. Take down your feeders in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Photo of a male Rufous Hummingbird at a feeder
Rufous Hummingbird
Photo by Greg Gillson

Oregon

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Oregon in mid-March and depart in mid-October.

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents primarily in the western half of Oregon.

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive in Oregon in mid-February (coastally first; not until April in Eastern half of state) and depart in early November.

Allen's Hummingbirds arrive in extreme SW Oregon in mid-February and depart in early August.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in Oregon the 2nd week of March and depart in mid-October.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up year round in the western half of Oregon. Otherwise, in the eastern half of Oregon put up your hummingbird feeders the 1st week of April. Take down your feeders in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Pennsylvania

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Pennsylvania the 1st week of April and depart in November.

Rare Rufous Hummingbirds are found occasionally, fall through winter, with a peak from the 2nd week of November to the 1st week of December.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Pennsylvania  the last week of March. Take down your feeders in early December if you have not seen hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Rhode Island

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Rhode Island in the 2nd week of April and depart the 1st week of October.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in Rhode Island the 1st week of April. Take down your feeders the 1st week of November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

South Carolina

Most Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in South Carolina in mid-March and depart in mid-November. However, Ruby-throated Hummingbirds can be found in small numbers year-round.

Several rare hummingbirds may occasionally be found wintering in South Carolina. Most show up in November and may remain to early April. However, Rufous Hummingbirds may show up as soon as August and remain all winter and spring.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up all year in South Carolina. If you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2-3 weeks by late December, you can probably take them down. Put up your hummingbird feeders again in early March.

South Dakota

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in South Dakota the 1st week of May and depart in mid-October.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in South Dakota in mid-May and depart in late August.

Rufous Hummingbirds are rare fall migrants in South Dakota, arriving in mid-July and departing the 3rd week of September.

Put out your hummingbird feeders in South Dakota the last week of April. Take your feeders down the end of October if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Tennessee

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Tennessee the last week of March and most depart in mid-November.

Several rare hummingbirds arrive in early November and sometimes remain into December or January. Rufous Hummingbirds may arrive in mid-July and remain until mid-March.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Tennessee during the 3rd week of March. Take your feeders down the 3rd week of December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Texas

Most Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Texas the 1st week of March and depart in early December. However, they also winter regularly in coastal Texas inland to Austin and San Antonio.

Most Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Texas in early March and depart in mid-November. However they also winter regularly in coastal Texas inland to Austin and San Antonio.

Lucifer Hummingbirds arrive in the Big Bend and Davis Mountain areas of Texas in late February and depart in mid-December.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds are found in Texas all year. However, they summer in the West and in fall and winter are found along the coast inland to Austin and San Antonio.

Rufous Hummingbirds migrate through Texas in early spring and fall. They winter coastally, inland to Austin and San Antonio. They are least common from April through June.

Buff-bellied Hummingbirds are year-round residents along the Texas coast inland to Austin and San Antonio.

There are numerous other rare hummingbirds in Texas throughout the year.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up all year in Texas.

Utah

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Utah the 3rd week of March and depart in mid-November.

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Southwestern Utah.

Costa's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in Southwestern Utah.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in mid-March and depart the 3rd week of October.

Rufous Hummingbirds are primarily fall migrants in Utah, late June to mid-October.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in early April and depart the 1st week of October.

Keep your hummingbird feeders up all year in Utah in the Southwest corner (near Las Vegas, Nevada). Elsewhere in Utah put out your hummingbird feeder the 2nd week of March. Take your feeders down in mid-November if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Vermont

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Vermont the 2nd week of April and depart the 3rd week of October.

Put out your hummingbird feeder in Vermont in early April. Take your feeders down in early December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Virginia

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Virginia the 2nd week of March and depart in early December.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Virginia in early March. Take your feeders down in mid-December if you haven't had any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Photo of a male Anna's Hummingbird on a branch
Anna's Hummingbird
Photo by Greg Gillson

Washington

Anna's Hummingbirds are year-round residents in the western half of Washington State.

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Washington in late April in the eastern half of Washington.

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive along the Washington coast in early February and depart from Washington in the end of October.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in Washington in the end of March and depart at the end of September.

Keep your hummingbird feeders out all year in the western half of Washington. In Eastern Washington put up your hummingbird feeders at the end of March. Take down your feeders in mid-October if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

West Virginia

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in West Virginia at the end of March and depart the 3rd week of October.

Rufous Hummingbirds arrive in mid-September and depart in mid-January.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in West Virginia in mid-March. Take your feeders down in mid-December if you haven't seen hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Wisconsin

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds arrive in Wisconsin in the 2nd week of April and depart in late November.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Wisconsin in early April. Take down your feeders in mid-December if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

Wyoming

Black-chinned Hummingbirds arrive in Wyoming the 1st week of May and depart the 3rd week of September.

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds arrive in Wyoming at the end of April and depart the end of September.

Rufous Hummingbirds are primarily a fall migrant in Wyoming from late June to mid-September.

Calliope Hummingbirds arrive in Wyoming the 1st week of May and depart the 3rd week of September.

Put up your hummingbird feeders in Wyoming the end of April. Take down your feeders the end of October if you haven't seen any hummingbirds in 2 weeks.

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